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M.Ed on Education and Innovation: EDUENG3: Curriculum Design, Development and Progression in English Language and Literacy

Course Description

This course focuses on curriculum design and development principles and practices in English language and literacy and their application in the English language classroom. Students will develop in-depth understanding of relevant principles and practices, and critically reflect on curriculum development for language and literacy skills in the UAE context. This evaluative process will allow them to apply relevant principles and effective practices from current research to develop medium to long-term English language learning pathways that foster English language and literacy skills progression. Students will also learn to critically self-evaluate their professional practice, knowledge and skills in terms of promoting and optimising curriculum progression and embedded assessment in the classroom.

Books

Course Resources

 

Week 1

Introduction to the Course

Course Outline Curriculum reforms in the UAE History of English in the UAE K-12 Curriculum

Required readings

Kippels, S., & Ridge, N. (2019). The growth and transformation of K–12 education in the UAE. In Education in the United Arab Emirates (pp. 37-55). Springer. Chapter 3

Gobert, M. T. (2019). Transformation in English language education in the UAE. In Education in the United Arab Emirates (pp. 113- 126). Springer, Chapter 7

Recommended readings

Matsumoto, A. (2019). Literature review on education reform in the UAE. International Journal of Educational Reform, 28(1), 4-23. https://doi.org/10.1177/1056787918824188

 

 

 

Week 2

Curriculum Progression and development

Overview of models and trends in curriculum development

Classroom-level curriculum development

Required readings

Shawer, S. F. (2017). Teacher-driven curriculum development at the classroom level: Implications for curriculum, pedagogy and teacher training. Teaching and Teacher Education, 63, 296-313. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2016.12.017

Bailey, A. L., & Heritage, M. (2014). The role of language learning progressions in improved instruction and assessment of English language learners. Tesol Quarterly, 48(3), 480-506. https://doi.org/10.1002/tesq.176

Recommended readings

Alsubaie, M. A. (2016). Curriculum development: Teacher involvement in curriculum development. Journal of Education and Practice, 7(9), 106-107. https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1095725.pdf

 

 

 

Week 3

The English language curriculum: Progression pathways

Required readings

Burroughs, R., & Smagorinsky, P. (2009). The secondary English curriculum and adolescent literacy. In Handbook of Adolescent Literacy Research, 170-182. 

Grant, J. O., & Pauly, H. M. (2016). Five, Oops, I Mean Six Big Ideas of Literacy. Colleagues, 13(1), 10. https://scholarworks.gvsu.edu/colleagues/vol13/iss1/10

Recommended readings

Ziegenfuss, R. G., Odhiambo, E., & Keyes, C. (2014). How Can We Help Students Who Are English Language Learners Succeed? Current Issues in Middle Level Education, 19(1), 58- 62. https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1087693.pdf

 

 

Week 4

The English language curriculum: Progression pathways

Required readings

Various curriculum documents for local and international curricula. - Ministry of Education English Language Curriculum: [here] -

National English Language Curriculum Framework (MoE, UAE - 2018) 

National curriculum in England: English programmes of study

Recommended readings

Weekes, T., & Jones, P. (2021). The challenges of mapping literacy development across the years of schooling. The Australian Journal of Language and Literacy,  44(2), 11-25. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF03652069

Jackson, F. (2020, December 1). Developing Curriculum Progression – forwards, backwards, up, down and across. Cambridge Assessment International. https://blog.cambridgeinternational.org/developing-curriculumprogression-forwards-backwards-up-down-and-across/

 

Week 5

Classroom strategies for curriculum progression Part 1

Laying the Groundwork for Visible Learning for Literacy

Required reading

Fisher, D., Frey, N., & Hattie, J. (2016). Visible learning for literacy, grades K-12: Implementing the practices that work best to accelerate student learning. Corwin Press. Chapter 1 (pp. 1-34

 

 

Week 6

Classroom strategies for curriculum progression – Part 2

Surface Literacy Learning

Required reading

Fisher, D., Frey, N., & Hattie, J. (2016). Visible learning for literacy, grades K-12: Implementing the practices that work best to accelerate student learning. Corwin Press. Chapter 2 (pp. 35-70)

 

Week 7

Classroom strategies for curriculum progression – Part 3

Deep Literacy Learning

Required reading

Fisher, D., Frey, N., & Hattie, J. (2016). Visible learning for literacy, grades K-12: Implementing the practices that work best to accelerate student learning. Corwin Press. Chapter 3 (pp. 71-104)

 

Week 8

Classroom strategies for curriculum progression – Part 4

Teaching Literacy for Transfer

Required reading

Fisher, D., Frey, N., & Hattie, J. (2016). Visible learning for literacy, grades K-12: Implementing the practices that work best to accelerate student learning. Corwin Press. Chapter 4 (pp. 105-131)

 

Week 9

Evaluating Curriculum Developments – Part 1

Meeting the UAE standards

Required readings

Teacher Standards for the UAE: [here]

UAE inspection framework: [here]

Recommended reading

Hakuta, K., Santos, M., & Fang, Z. (2013). Challenges and opportunities for language learning in the context of the CCSS and the NGSS. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 56(6), 451-454. https://doi.org/10.1002/JAAL.164

 

 

Week 10

Evaluating Curriculum Developments – Part 2

Teacher Reflection and Pupil Voice

Required readings

Marcos, J. M., Sanchez, E., & Tillema, H. H. (2011). Promoting teacher reflection: What is said to be done. Journal of Education for Teaching, 37(1), 21-36. https://doi.org/10.1080/02607476.2011.538269

McIntyre, D., Pedder*, D., & Rudduck, J. (2005). Pupil voice: comfortable and uncomfortable learnings for teachers. Research papers in education, 20(2), 149-168. https://doi.org/10.1080/02671520500077970

 

 

Week 11

Evaluating Curriculum Developments – Part 3

Determining Impact, Responding When Impact Is Insufficient, and Knowing What Does Not Work

Required reading

Fisher, D., Frey, N., & Hattie, J. (2016). Visible learning for literacy, grades K-12: Implementing the practices that work best to accelerate student learning. Corwin Press. Chapter 5 (pp. 133-169)